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Estonia will transfer to Ukraine museum valuables stolen from Crimea

#DefeatRussia
January 30,2024 654
Estonia will transfer to Ukraine museum valuables stolen from Crimea

Estonia will transfer to Ukraine 274 archaeological artifacts that criminals attempted to transport through the country illegally, reported Vira Konyk, the Head of the Congress of Ukrainians of Estonia. Expert analysis has determined that the items belong to the early Iron Age and Iron Age cultures, constituting part of Ukraine’s cultural heritage. These valuables were stolen from Crimea after the Ukrainian peninsula fell under Russian occupation.

A solemn presentation of Ukrainian treasures took place at the Estonian History Museum on January 23. The expertise revealed that coins from ancient Olbia and Thrace were among the treasures that ended up at the Estonian border. The greatest historical value is represented by gold coins of the Scythians, dating back approximately 2300 years.

Some of them date back to the times of the rule of the Thracian king Lysimachus, who was one of the commanders of Alexander the Great. There is abundant evidence that similar Scythian and Sarmatian gold ornaments were taken to Russia by so-called black archaeologists,” said the Ambassador on special errands of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine, Ihor Ostash.


The archaeological artifacts are currently being prepared for return to Ukraine, as reported by the Ministry of Culture and Information Policy. 

“Thanks to the strong collaboration between the Estonian and Ukrainian sides, we celebrate another victory for our state on the cultural front. Soon, the exhibits will be handed over to Ukraine. They will effectively complement our national heritage and demonstrate historical justice,” previously stated Rostyslav Karandieiev, Ukraine’s Acting Minister of Culture.

The police and border service of Estonia successfully prevented the illegal importation of archaeological artifacts into the country in 2019. Until now, these treasures have been kept by Estonian experts.

Cover: Ihor Ostash

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